Get Adobe Flash player

National Heritage

anjar
Anjar (C/1984)
baalbek
Baalbak (C/1984)
byblos
Byblos (C/1984)
tyre
Tyre (C/1984)
qadisha
Qadisha and the Cedar Forest: (C/1998)

LEBANESE HISTORICAL AND NATURAL SITES INSCRIBED ON THE WORLD HERITAGE LIST

Anjar (C/1984)
The ruins of Anjar, a city founded by Caliph Walid I at the beginning of the 8th century, have a very methodical layout, reminiscent of the palace-cities of ancient times. They have a unique testimony to Omayyad city-planning.
Registered on the World Heritage List of 1984.

Baalbak (C/1984)
This Phoenician city, the seat of worship to a triad of dieties, was known as Heliopolis during the Greek period. It retained its religious function in Roman times when the sanctuary of Heliopolitan Jupiter drew thousands of pilgrims. Baalbek, with its colossal structures, is one of the most impressive examples of Imperial Roman architecture at it's apogee.
Registered on the World Heritage List of 1984.

Byblos (C/1984)
Byblos is the site of the multi-layered ruins of one of the most ancient cities of Lebanon, inhabited since Neolithic times and closely tied to the legends and history of the Mediterranean region for many thousands of years. Byblos is directly associated with the history of the diffusion of the Phoenician alphabet.
Registered on the World Heritage List of 1984.

Tyre (C/1984)
Tyre, where according to legend, the purple dye was invented, was the great Phoenician city that ruled the seas and founded prosperous colonies such as Cadiz and Carthage. Its historical role declined at the end of the Crusades. It conserves important archaeological remains, mainly from Roman times.
Registered on the World Heritage List of 1984.

Qadisha and the Cedar Forest: (C/1998): Criterion iii:
The Qadisha Valley has been the site of monastic communities continuously since the earliest years of Christianity. The trees in the Cedar Forest are survivors of a sacred forest and one of the most highly prized building materials of the ancient world.
Criterion iv: The monasteries of the Qadisha Valley are the most significant surviving examples of this fundamental demonstration of the Christian Faith.
Registered on the World Heritage List of 1998.